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CBS Evening News With Scott Pelley

News/Business. Scott Pelley. (2013) New. (HD) (CC) (Stereo)




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Pelley 14, U.s. 8, New Orleans 6, Syria 6, Brendan Marrocco 5, Brendan 5, Nguyen 3, Moscow 3, America 3, Rodriguez 3, California 2, Russia 2, Aleppo 2, Lupe 2, Syrians 2, Bolshoi 2, Cbs 2, Biotene 2, Nexium 2, Obama 2,
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  CBS    CBS Evening News With Scott Pelley    News/Business. Scott Pelley.   
   (2013) New. (HD) (CC) (Stereo)  

    January 29, 2013
    6:30 - 7:00pm EST  

>> pelley: tonight, have a look at a miracle! brendan marrocco who lost all of his limbs in iraq gets two transplanted arms. which is harder, the lack of arms or the lack of legs? >> lack of arms by far. >> pelley: david martin's interview with marrocco and dr. jon lapook on how the surgeons did it. the president calls for the biggest change in immigration law in 30 years. >> there is a pathway to citizenship. >> pelley: bill whitaker in california with supporters and opponents. new orleans tackles crime before the super bowl arrives. jim axelrod shows us how. and intrigue at the bolshoi. charlie d'agata in moscow on a vicious attack at the world's most famous ballet company. >> this is terrible.
this is corruption and this is criminal. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. it was not a close call for us today. the most amazing story that we saw hands down involves a courageous young u.s. army sergeant severely wounded in iraq and the amazing surgery that gave him arms-- two real human arms. the operation on 26-year-old sergeant brendan marrocco of new york was performed in december but today we got our first look at the results. david martin has the story. >> reporter: when brendan marrocco moved his arms today he made medical history. >> i feel like i'm getting a second chance to start over after i got hurt. >> reporter: he was gesturing with transplanted arms-- not prosthetic arms but real arms
from an anonymous donor who died. >> it feels amazing. it's something that i was waiting for for a long time and now that it finally happened i -- i really don't know what to say because it's just such a big thing for my life and it's -- it's just fantastic. >> reporter: amazing and fantastic because brendan marrocco was the first quadruple amputee from america's wars to survive-- just barely as he told us when we first met him nearly three years ago. >> i died three times, came back. >> reporter: died lee times? flat pulse? >> yeah. flat out dead. >> reporter: his vehicle had been hit in iraq in 2009 by an iranian-made roadside bomb which severed his carotid artery and tore off all four of his limbs. which is harder: the lack of arms or the lack of legs? >> lack of arms by far. >> reporter: by far? >> without legs you can still be
independent, you know? without arms there's so much more that you can't do. >> reporter: a team of 16 surgeons-- led by dr. andrew lee at johns hopkins university hospital in baltimore-- performed the 13-hour surgery last month. before that, there had been only six successful double hand transplants and never anything like this. >> we knew arm transplants can help people but we didn't know whether we could transplant so high up in the arm. >> reporter: marrocco will have to go through years of physical therapy, which meant the decision to do the transplant was as much psychological as medical. >> with the determination and stamina that brendan has demonstrated we had no doubt this was the right thing to do for him. >> reporter: his doctors predicted marrocco will eventually be using his hands for just about everything. >> you know, i never really accepted the fact that i didn't have arms so now that i have
them again it's -- it's almost like it never happened. it's like i went back four years and i'm me again. >> reporter: brendan marrocco was discharged from the hospital today. no one will be watching his recovery more closely than four other servicemen who have since joined him as survivors of quadruple amputations. >> pelley: amazing, david. thank you very much. we've been talking in the newsroom all day about how this is possible so, of course, we turn to dr. jon lapook. jon, you think of all the connections that have to be made, the veins, the arteries, the bones, the nerves. how did they do it? >> scott, the idea was exactly that. to match up all of these different tissues in scott's body with the tissues in these transplanted arms. first they connected the bones using plates and screws. next the muscles and the tendons were connected. finally the blood vessels, the arteries and veins so important for bringing newshour itchment to these newly transplanted arms. what's so fascinating is the way
the nerve supply is going to be established is that the nerves from brendan's own arm are going to slowly tkpwre down into the transplanted arm at the rate of at most one inch every month for the next year or two years and then reestablish that nerve supply. so it will be a couple years before we know exactly how much function he will regain. >> pelley: the nerves know where to go. now what about rejection? these arms came from someone else's body. what are the chances they would be rejectd? >> they're trying something new that's been used only five times before that allows them to use only one antirejection drugs-- these can have side effects-- instead of three. what they did was they took the bone marrow cells from the donor's spine and they gave them to brendan and what these donor cells will do is hopefully trick brendan's immune system into thinking these newly transplanted arms are part of brendan's own normal body and then they won't reject them. >> pelley: amazing. doctor, thanks very much. today the president laid out what could be the most sweeping reform of immigration law in decades. it would include a pathway to
citizenship for the 11 million illegal immigrants who are already in america. here's how president obama described his plan in las vegas today. >> we've got to lay out a path, a process that includes passing a background check, paying taxes, paying a penalty, learning english and then going to the back of the line behind all the folks who are trying to come here legally. that's only fair. (cheers and applause) all right? so that means it won't be a quick process but it will be a fair process and it will lift these individuals out of the shadows and give them a chance to earn their way to a green card and eventually to i citizenship. >> pelley: but first mr. obama said there would have to be stronger enforcement on the borders. his plan is similar to a bill that both democrats and republicans are introducing in the senate. this may be the best chance for immigration reform in decades. it could mean that a lot of families would not live in fear
of being split up as bill whitaker found with the colin family in california. >> reporter: jamie colin helps his mother lupe at one of the family's two dry cleaners in southern california. do you feel like an american success story? >> i do. my parents have worked so hard and everything i am, everything my sister is, we owe to them. >> reporter: the colin family's immigration status is complicated. jamie and his sister diana were brought from mexico as children. president obama's deferred action program allows them to stay for work and school. their younger siblings were born in the u.s., but their parents have been here illegally for 22 years. their father declined to appear on camera. lupe says they have earned a path to citizenship. >> i have my own business. i'm living here like an american citizen because i pay taxes. >> we're aspiring citizens, that's what it is. so i -- obama promised us an
immigration reform. >> reporter: so what would these changes mean to your family? >> well, i think we'd feel more secure, we don't have to live with the fear of being deported, having our family torn apart. >> that's a calculation that they made when they came into the country illegally. >> reporter: jack martin is with the federation for american immigration reform, a group that lobbies for strict immigration enforcement. >> they've been in the country breaking the law all that period of time and that should earn them no priority with regard to people who've been waiting outside the country. >> reporter: martin says allowing the collins to stay in the u.s. will be no more effective at stopping illegal immigration than a 1986 law that allowed three million illegal immigrants to apply for legal resident status. >> we now have 11 or 12 million illegal aliens in the country. instead of cutting down on illegal immigration, it led to an increase. >> reporter: there are folks who will say that your family and families like yours should
get to the back of the line. >> we've been here, like i said, as aspiring citizens for 22 years. is that the back of the line? what is the back of the line? >> reporter: the colin family believes the political muscle hispanics showed at the polls in november will push democrats and republicans to pass immigration reform with a path to citizenship this year. scott? >> pelley: bill whitaker in our los angeles newsroom. bill, thanks very much. tonight the british oil company b.p. is guilty of criminal charges of manslaughter in the deaths of 11 workers from the deep water horizon drilling rig. a federal judge in new orleans accepted b.p.'s guilty plea today. the disaster in the gulf of mexico in 2010 unleashed the largest accidental oil spill ever. b.p. agreed to pay $4.5 billion which includes the biggest criminal fine in u.s. history. mark strassmann is in new orleans. >> reporter: b.p.'s guilty plea concedes b.p. managers
ignored test readings that indicated combustible gas seeped into the well on the evening of april 20, 2010. hours later, the deepwater horizon rig exploded. the company also admitted to lying about how much oil was leaking. they said at first a few thousand barrels per day leaked from the well when b.p.'s own engineers knew it was more than 60,000 barrels a day. shelley anderson's husband jason, a 35-year-old rig supervisor, was killed in the explosion. she was given five minutes in court to speak for herself, their daughter lacy-- now seven-- and son river, now four. >> when i told my son river that i had to be here and i had to go and do this for daddy he got very excited, his face lit up "i want to go see daddy, too. i want to go see my daddy." and i had to explain to him that i was coming here to do something for daddy but that daddy wasn't going to actually be here and that we would never, ever see him again. >> reporter: this plea deal puts the criminal case behind b.p. as a company but b.p. still
could face paying as much as $23 billion in government fines for violating the clean water act. mark strassmann, cbs news, new orleans. >> pelley: in washington, senator john kerry will be sworn in later this week as the 68th secretary of state, succeeding hillary clinton. kerry was confirmed today by his senate colleagues 94-3. kerry, who is 69, is the son of a diplomat, a decorated veteran of the vietnam war, he made an unsuccessful run for president, as you recall, a democratic nominee in 2004. kerry has represented massachusetts in the senate for 28 years and chairs the foreign relations committee. one of the first challenges that kerry will face is syria's civil war. today there was another mass killing in the ancient city of aleppo. at least 50 young men were apparently executed. it's not clear who killed them or why. this war pits various rebel groups against the 40-year
dictatorship of the assad family and clarissa ward is following the story for us tonight. >> reporter: they were dumped in a canal, their hands tied behind their backs. most of the men appear to have been shot at close range. most looked to be in their 20s and 30s. for months, rebels have fought the syrian army to a stalemate in aleppo, syria's largest city. on monday we sat s.a.t. down to u.s. ambassador to syria robert ford. he was an early backer of the syrian opposition but in 2011 was forced to leave the country after an armed mob of assad regime supporters attacked his car. he told us that the u.s. is still committed to bringing assad down. >> oh, the u.s. has done a lot! we're playing a leading role in many ways. for example, we have substantially tightened the financial squeeze on the regime. and at the same time we're
providing vital humanitarian assistance -- >> reporter: humanitarian assistance doesn't stop bombs. >> well, it's important, though, for syrians to stay alive. >> reporter: so are we willing to wait another two years and another 60,000 dead? >> i don't know how long it will take. we obviously deeply regret the violence. >> reporter: but ford was adamant that the u.s. has no intention of intervening directly in syria. >> americans can try to help on the margins but ultimately we have to let these societies find their own ways forward. the americans can't fix this problem. syrians have to fix this problem. >> pelley: the syrian opposition has been meeting in paris this week where we find clarissa ward. and clarissa, what has ambassador ford been trying to accomplish with the syrian opposition there? >> essentially ambassador ford has been trying to rally international support for the syrian opposition but one fundamental issue remains which is that many of these syrian
opposition leaders who have been traveling the world and attending these types of meetings simply don't have any real credibility with rebels on the ground who are inside syria actually fighting this war. >> pelley: the rebels are splintered into a number of group there is in syria in a war that's almost two years on now. thank you very much. we'll look at what new orleans is doing about crime on the eve of the super bowl. and the day the ocean turned into a giant bubble bath when the "cbs evening news" continu continues. feeling of a dry mouth? nce the it can be the side effect of many medications. dry mouth can be frustrating... and ignoring it can lead to... sipping water can help, but dentists recommend biotene. biotene moisturizes and helps supplement some of saliva's enzymes, providing soothing relief when you need it most. don't ignore dry mouth... look for biotene in your oral care section today.
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learn where to find your number at >> pelley: the police in new orleans are calling in reinforcements as thousands pour into the city this weekend for the super bowl this weekend. we asked jim axelrod to have a look at this. >> reporter: this was one month ago today, the most frightening moment of tim nguyen's life. does it scare you to watch this now? >> yes. i couldn't bear to watch it at all. >> reporter: nguyen had owned this small grocery in new orleans for 20 years. he'd never been robbed before. police say anthony fields hopped the counter with a handgun and told nguyen to get down on the floor. and you grab his gun? >> yeah, i tried grabbing his gun. >> reporter: had you ever been in a fight before? >> no, sir, never been. >> reporter: so this is just pure instinct? >> right. just survival mode right here. >> reporter: nguyen says he struggled for 15 minutes and was pistol whipped eight times before the assailant grabbed $500 and ran. still, new orleans police
suspect ronald surpass says crime stats out thursday shows new orleans is turning a corner on crime. >> we preliminary estimate that in 2012 there were less murders, less rapes, less armed robberies, less auto burglaries, less residential burglaries, less business burglaries,less auto thefts. >> reporter: but the murder rate here is more than ten times the national average. during super bowl week, serpas is quadrupling the number of officers patrolling french quarter. he's getting help from neighboring departments so police presence in high crime neighborhoods does not diminish. >> we're working on this issue very hard of young men killing each other. but when you get down here in the french quarter, usually the most danger you're going to suffer is the hangover from a hurricane or hand grenade. >> reporter: those are cocktails, not threats. but tim nguyen, whose store is not in the french quarter, has had enough. did this robbery make you rethink about owning and running a business here in this
neighborhood? >> yes, sir. it really -- i told my wife we need to sell the business and get out of here real quick. >> reporter: anthony fields was arrested a week later. he was on probation for a number of armed robberies and, scott, the chief says given his record if fields is convicted he expects him to be put away for 99 years. >> pelley: jim, thanks very much. another big name in sports is accused of using performance-enhancing drugs. that's next. ♪ you know my heart burns for you... ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm singing the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is!
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>> pelley: we got our first look inside that brazilian nightclub where more than 230 people died in a fire. there was a pile of shoes they found there as evidence of the panic as the customers tried to escape sunday morning. witnesses say the ceiling caught fire when the band members set off flares as part of the show. the police said today that the flares were meant for outdoor use but they were cheaper than the safer indoor flares. the new -- the miami new times says that it has evidence new york yankees star alex rodriguez has been using illegal performance-enhancing drugs. the paper reported today that rodriguez and five other major league players bought human growth hormone and other substances from a clinic in florida. rodriguez denies the report tonight. in 2009, rodriguez admitted using steroids earlier in his career but then he said he
stopped. australia has been hit with some of the worst flooding in its history. one town, bundaberg, was underwater today. the remnants of a cyclone caused a river to burst its banks. crews have rhett cued thousands of people there. the storm also churned up ocean creating waves of thick foam. kids flocked to the beach to swim in it. we never thought we'd have to ask this question but has ballet become too violent? that story is next. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day.
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>> pelley: finally tonight, you might think of ballet as among the finest of fine hearts but who knew it could be so violent. in russia, it's a blood sport. from moscow, here is charlie d'agata. >> reporter: it's a tale of star-crossed lovers, murderous vengeance, and betrayal. that's just on stage. behind the scenes, a real life drama unfolded of poisonous competition among russia's top dancers. last week it spilled out into the open when a masked man threw a jar of acid in the face of sergei feli,g, the bolshoi's
artistic director. says peugs fell on dancers in the company. in this ballet mad city where people are as devoted as die heart sports fans the attack cut like a dagger. >> this is outrage. this is corruption and this ises criminal. >> reporter: anastasia voluchkova was a prima ballerina with the bolshoi in 2003 before she was fired for being overweight. she told us about the jealousies among the dancers. >> cut it, ribbons, kit it off. >> reporter: they cut your ribbons. >> yes, but off, it breaks when you dance. >> reporter: so people sabotaged -- >> exactly, this is sabotage, exactly. >> reporter: the walls of the bolshoi theater echo with legendary stories of vengeance that go back for more than a century. needles found in costumes, broken glass in a ballet shoe, but there's never been anything this savage. in the weeks before the attack, his tires were slashed, his
e-mail account was hacked and he said he'd received death threats. he took over the bolshoi in 2011, one of his first big decisions created waves. he hired american david hallberg as a principal dancer-- a role that's usually gone to a russian. yekaterina novikova works in the bolshoi's front office. >> every time he takes any artistic decision it means somebody's happy and somebody's unhappy. you can not please everybody. >> reporter: it's the swirl of the investigation and some dancers have taken lie detector tests but police have made no arrests and while they continue to question the dancers, sellout crowds applaud the tales of mystery and intrigue. charlie d'agata, cbs news, moscow. >> pelley: and that's the "cbs evening news" for tonight. for all of us at cbs news all around the world. good night. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group at wgbh
welcome to 9news at 7:00, we have the blitz first, some big headlines we must get to. first of all, a jury finds a former police officer guilty of voluntary manslaughter. his name is daniel harmon- wright and he shot and killed an unarmed woman back when he was a cop in february of last year. now he claims -- with his fingers stuck in the window and he says he fired at her only after warning her first. the jury wasn't buying it, now he faces 25 years behind bars. that's when he is sentenced later in